Bye Bye Net Neutrallity Laws!

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Step it Up!
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PostPosted: Wed Jan 15, 2014 4:24 am
Avert your eyes away from our bought off, out of touch government for a brief moment and something like this happens:
A federal appeals court today nullified key provisions of the FCC’s net neutrality rules, opening the door to a curated approach to internet delivery that allows broadband providers to block content or applications as they see fit.

In other words, this federal appeals court has nullified a few legal restrictions in place to prevent ISPs from restricting what sites you can or can not access. What this essentially means is that Verizon, AT&T or Comcast can now charge you extra for access to certain sites that might be in direct competition to their television services(e.g. Hulu, Netflix, or any another legal/illegal streaming service).

Here are the key provisions that were nullified:
*Wireline or fixed broadband providers may not block lawful content, applications, services, or non-harmful devices. Mobile broadband providers may not block lawful websites, or block applications that compete with their voice or video telephony services.

*Fixed broadband providers may not unreasonably discriminate in transmitting lawful network traffic. That rule, however, does not apply to wireless services.

I hope you like paying triple the price for a "premium" internet package to gain access to a lot of the same shit you were already accessing before! Its pretty much the same model as cable TV now, which is such a consumer friendly model...

Is it even worth debating anymore whether or not our Judicial branch has too much fucking power?

Source:http://www.wired.com/threatlevel/2014/01/court-kills-net-neutrality/
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King of Thieves
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PostPosted: Wed Jan 15, 2014 1:20 pm
This is mostly the FCC's fault. In order for Net Neutrality to work as it was stated, ISPs would have to be classified as common carriers. A common carrier is a service that carries goods that cannot discriminate what it carries to the extent of the law. In any case, in 2010, the FCC deemed that ISPs were not common carriers. The court used this as a foundation to poke holes in Net Neutrality and why the FCC has no jurisdiction on it. For instance, the FCC can fine public broadcast networks for indecency, but they can't touch cable-only access channels like HBO from showing full frontal nudity on Game of Thrones.

The good news is that the FCC still has the authority to declare that ISPs are common carriers. Of course, this requires another court battle that I'm sure the ISPs will fight tooth and nail to win.

But the problem is that so-called edge providers, services that provide content over IP from what I gather, have a political struggle against ISPs. It's a long standing war of "I paid to build this infrastructure, therefore, I get to decide who gets to use it and how they get to use it" vs. blocking/discriminating content. Other common carrier services, like parcel delivery, has no such concept. They didn't build the roads, they have no ownership of the underlying pathways to get from point A to B.

There really is no simple solution to this problem.

On a silly note, I find it funny that people are the exact opposite when it comes to cable. They'd rather pay for channels piecemeal than get a bundle of crap they don't want.
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PostPosted: Wed Jan 15, 2014 7:08 pm
XenoL wrote:The good news is that the FCC still has the authority to declare that ISPs are common carriers. Of course, this requires another court battle that I'm sure the ISPs will fight tooth and nail to win.

Given our current federal court's track record, I highly doubt they'll side with the FCC on this one. It'll be even worse if they appeal to our terrible supreme court.

Oh and I love the irony in this quote from the The "Competitive" Enterprise Institute praising this anti-competitive decision:
Spoiler
"net neutrality is another example of over regulation that flies in the face of every proper tenet of infrastructure wealth creation and expansion of free speech and consumer welfare.”
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Step it Up!
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PostPosted: Fri Apr 25, 2014 4:31 pm
Oh fuck you FCC. I feel silly for thinking that you'd actually do your job and protect the open internet.
http://time.com/74703/net-neutrality-fc ... advocates/
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You'll be a Hero, in Time
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PostPosted: Tue Apr 29, 2014 5:08 pm
XenoL, it's funny that you mention parcel delivery as a common carrier first. Usually when I hear the phrase, telephone companies come to mind first since they can't reject anybody who wants to use a phone service (I mean yeah there's the Do Not Call list but look how well that's worked).
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Chrisiam wrote:I never force my opinions on others, when I do find someone that disagrees with me we talk it out, discuss the pros and cons and in the end we both agree that I am right.
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Robber in Training
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PostPosted: Sat Jul 12, 2014 8:59 am
In some places they did build it, in others the cities built it, and in my town the cable company and the city have a contract where they worked together to build it and keep other providers out. Thanks to my city officials making bank I have only one choice. They hold us hostage, why can't we do the same?

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PostPosted: Fri Mar 06, 2015 2:44 am
that so-called edge providers, services that provide content over IP from what I gather, have a political struggle against ISPs. It's a long standing war of "I paid to build this infrastructure, therefore, I get to decide who gets to use it and how they get to use it" vs. blocking/discriminating content. Other common carrier services, like parcel delivery, has no such concept.
Arslan1

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